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April 1

    I skied today for the second time this season.  The snow pack has been steadily building, so it was as good as skiing gets for someone of my limited abilities.  Usually there are rocks showing by this time of year.  Of course usually most of our snow is gone, instead of still being two feet deep.  
    I'm seldom clever or devious enough to play April Fool's jokes.  My son who got married last fall sent an email explaining how due to some technicalities related to their name change he and his wife haven't been married these last 7 months.  The email was quite believable, but because of the date we all pooh-poohed it.  Of course a year ago he used April 1 to announce his engagement, so one never knows...

April 2
    It turns out they did get their name change completed, but without complications...  One never knows, dealing with bureaucracies...
    My day had several interesting facets.  The waffle iron which I revived several months ago died again, but with about an hour of nurturing, replacing the one wire I hadn't replaced previously, it is ready to waffle again.  The waffle iron had features you wouldn't see today such as mica washers to insulate the metal parts from the electricity.
    I made minivases today, for an order which, when I checked the mail, was paid for.
    I've been getting a lot of special orders lately, like a goblet fountain with 4 pouring spigots which may or may not happen.  Must be that time of year.  
I spent the afternoon manufacturing DVD's.
    I submitted my resume to the library for the Children's Librarian position, and have an interview on Friday.  If I get the job, I will continue making pottery as much as I am now, but won't be around quite as much for the sales part...  Also days off will become a rarity.  Most musicians and artists have a "day job," I've held out, but now seems a good time to get one, if it happens.  

April 3
    We've been waiting for a warming trend--today it got to 46 F (8C), as good as it's been for a long time.  So I found a few things to do outside, like replace the piece of pipe that froze a couple nights ago which goes to one of our outdoor spigots, and fix a flat bicycle tire.
    It's hard to think of what pottery to make right now, so I settled for a bunch of bowls today, which nest nicely in storage so as not to take up too much room.
    This evening I bicycled along the lake road, and surprised 7 slim whitetail deer, coming down for their evening foraging.  
    Twice in the last week the garbage can containing chicken feed  had the lid pushed open overnight, in such a way that the lid was stuck open.  The second time made me sure it was deer, who must have smelled the grain and nosed it open.  They were already coming to the area to browse our compost pile, which has a lot of apple cores.  
    That was the other thing I did today--made the last of last year's apples into 4 quarts of applesauce.  So there are fresh applecores on the compost...

April 4
    The library job interview went fine, but it was pretty stressful.  I think the only other job interview I've done in my life was for the public radio folk program, and that consisted of making a sample tape and talking to the station manager for a few minutes.  I did have to apply to work in the sorghum fields in high school, but any one healthy and crazy enough to apply was accepted, so there was no drama.  Anyway, back in the present, over half of the interview was about  running the afterschool and preschool programs, which are certainly the toughest part of the job.  I have helped with afterschool programs, but not been in charge of them, so...  It will be at least a week till the results are known.

April 5
    One of our toilets was leaking at the base, so today became the day to install a new wax seal.  Plumbing is my least favorite handyman activity, so  I always start early on a day the hardware store is open all day.  Aside from having to grind one bolt off which was too corroded, it went pretty well, but it will be a while before I'll rest secure that it's fixed.  The thing with plumbing is that you generally have to disconnect other things to get at the part to fix, so reconnecting can introduce new leak possibilities.
    It snowed flurries throughout most of the day, but never accumulated.  Same predicted for tomorrow...

 It snowed an inch overnight, and through most of the day fell as wet slush...  So I worked on videos again:
Thine is the Glory--an Easter hymn.  

Now the Green blade rises--also Easter hymn.

Steen 4 President Strong on Defense--a modest proposal.   
    Then I checked my email, and in one of those rare instances where online life connects with reality, online friend Heather and her husband Phillippe wanted to come and visit me from France.  Since I was home, they came this afternoon (I realize that sounds a bit immediate).  Heather contacted me about 6 months ago with a lot of questions about our area, and since she appreciated my answers, said at that time that they'd like to visit when they came house hunting.  Having started purchasing a house in the Coeur D'Alene area, the pressure was off enough for them to visit today.  It was a very pleasant way to end the rainy afternoon...

April 7 It snowed an inch tonight--like in the first book of C.S. Lewis' Narnia series--it is always winter and never Christmas...  The only hope on the horizon is talk of 60 (20C) degree weather this weekend...    A neighbor and I went and filled his truck with firewood today, and split the load, as it's apparent the heating season won't be over till the snow is gone...
    On the brighter side, the first cabbage family plants were popping up in the greenhouse today.  I've started the tomato plants in the one heated room of the house (that might change for the warmer, since getting the half cord of wood).  Tomatoes are quite sensitive to freezing, while cabbage plants are quite tough that way...
  
  
    April 8.  
    Although the day did start snowy, the sun emerged enough so there was a sense of possible improvement in the weather.  I worked on glazing pots, bookkeeping, and removing some built in shelving from our lakeview cottage.   There are lots of decisions to make when renovating a house, and most of them are complicated...

April 9
    Yes, it snowed occasionally, but there was sun also, and the forecast (after snow tonight) still looks like a short spate of genuine warmth for the weekend, so we won't despair yet...   In our back yard a pansy which was blooming when covered with snow last fall came uncovered and is still blooming.  I don't think that counts as the first bloom of spring--just the last bloom of fall...
    I had some free time this evening, so I made some more music videos.  I sorted my videos by style (results are shown on the video menu tab), and realized I've shortchanged the blues in my recordings, so I've added two blues, and a swingy depression era tune called  Darkness on the Delta.

April 10

    I got an email, and a phone call, from separate newspapers on separate coasts of our country today. Unfortunately, rather than offering me fame or fortune, they both wanted permission to print the above photo of Leo Kottke, which I took almost two years ago.  Apparently he's starting a tour, and both papers Googled for images rather than just accepting the ones likely offered in his press kit.  It does bring out a sense of his irrascible character...
    Meanwhile the weather is verging on pleasant.  I assembled disc vases from components thrown yesterday, and I observed the library after school program.  All these were good experiences.   Next week I'll lead the after school program as a try out...
I'd rather drink muddy waterTurn your money greenDarkness on the Delta

April 11
    I attended a lecture at Gonzaga  last night on the Crusades and the connection to modern terrorism.  The presenter's thesis was that there is no connection, aside from modern historians (who were steeped in guilt over  European imperialism) interpreting the crusades as more of the same (and modern Arabs who seize on this for their own propaganda purposes).  The troubles in the Middle East are mostly the result of the fall of the Ottoman Empire and the imposed nationization which occurred at the end of WWI.  He argued that at the the time of the first crusade, Islam had been moving aggressively into Europe, and that the crusades were more a response than an imperialistic assault, and their goal was to help their Christian brothers in the East.  But my wife pointed out to me later that the presenter, who was Roman Catholic, made no reference in his hour and a half speech, to the Eastern Orthodox, already in the area, and even slaughtered by the Crusaders in one of their crusades.
    It was an interesting lecture, but my usual response to sitting and listening to learned discussion (or whatever) is to repeatedly doze in and out.  This is a mixed blessing, to be sure.  There are times when the ability to doze is a godsend.  But sometimes I'm actually wishing I could remain cognizant...
    Today was sunny and warm.  I had a clay meeting in Coeur D'Alene, to which I contributed little, but enjoyed for all that.

April 12

I've been seeing butterflies for a week or so, but today with the heat (60 F or 18C) there were lots of them, probably freshly emerged.  This one was perched on the snow briefly before I got its picture.  There's still a foot of snow or more in a lot of places, but the sunny places are clear, and I saw the first buttercup on the ridge as I bicycled by this evening.
   
April 13

    grass widows
    We bicycled to the end of the lake today.  One sunny ridge was crowded with grass widows--pretty stunning when yesterday I only saw a couple buttercups.   It was perfect weather, but one could feel the icebox effect from the piles of snow still everywhere in the shade...

April 14
    Pleasant weather is just a memory, as it rained an inch today, and is threatening to snow tonight again.  There are a couple crocuses that opened in the heat yesterday, but kept closed today.  This rain broke my son's record
skiing every day for about 125 days straight.  The mill pond is rapidly losing its ice, but the main part of the lake looked pretty solid yesterday.
    I got an email enquiry this morning enquiring about 40 goblets.  Every once in a while I get emails in broken English wanting "ceramic and do I ship Nigeria."  So I'm pretty skeptical, especially about unusual requests.   However the couple called later, and they are looking for wedding guest presents for a wedding, so I'm feeling more comfortable about the process.    But I have a box sitting on the shelf awaiting payment before shipping for more than a month, so you never know how these things are going to end...

April 15
    After making goblets all morning, I spent the afternoon working on after school program projects.  There are two age groups involved, so I needed two levels of crafts.  Assembling the program was a creative process.  For the younger students, I decided to do their silhouettes with a slide projector as a light source, after which they could cut them out and mount them on construction paper.  That led to a reading them a book which featured a shadow play skit, of removing
behind  a screen all sorts of furniture a child apparently ate.  Then I decided to do a story song by Pete Seeger about a bullfrog, using the shadowplay technique.  
    For the older kids, I've planned on making faux stained glass, by ironing two sheets of waxed paper together with bits of crayon inside, which creates colorful organic patterns of color.  Then they can make various shapes of construction paper overlay, simulating the lead in stained glass.
    I can see where, if I get the job, eventually I'll have to pore through kid craft books for ideas, but currently I'm enjoying the different kind of challenge presented than just attaching goblet stems.

April 16

    So today I spent attaching goblet stems... :-)
So here's a picture of a Columbian Ground Squirrel I took on Sunday.
Columbian Ground Squirrel
They're one of the bigger ground squirrels--I thought at first it was a marmot...  They're native to the NW US and SW Canada.

April 17
I recorded Sondahl's Modal March today. This is a tune I've whistled for years but never tried playing on guitar till today.  I often have tunes going in my head when walking or bicycling, and often whistle them.   More often than not they are marches, suitable to walking, as opposed to waltzes, for example, which make you walk funny...
    My tryout with the library children's program went well, but had its moments of interest.  I did the shadow play, having practiced it once, well aware that I never decided how to end it.  I enjoy a bit of improvisational challenge.  I sang them a song called "The Frozen Logger," totally forgetting the tune, thus using the first tune that came out of the banjo with the correct rhythm.  Fortunately none of them had heard it before to be critical.  A couple of kids decided to skip out, and when I called them back, was assured by a third kid that it was okay--they always did it--had to go home to get something they'd forgotten.  Thus was I bamboozled.  They stayed and  played in the school yard until it was their hour (there are two hours in a row for two ages of children).  The head librarian didn't blame me for this lapse, but it was a bit eye opening the shenanigans that are potentially possible...
It's still a week or so before I'll know if I got the position...  I read from Robert McCloskey, and spoke highly to the older children of the novels of Sid Fleischman...
    A friend from our local pottery group called today with questions about setting up a studio.  I was sort of encouraging, although I'm always quick to point out that if it was easy to make a living as an artist, a lot more people would do it.  Then  when I asked more of the details of her plan, she mentioned she was planning to buy a house and build a studio, from which it soon became apparent she was getting a divorce, and is hoping to make a living as a potter.  I ache for her on both counts...

April 18
It was windy today, and apparently that made the ice break up and disappear on the Mill Pond.  So Spring is coming, in spite of it snowing on me as I turned the vegetable garden at the pottery today.  They're predicting possible record cold high temperatures for this weekend, and chance of snow through the weekend.  This is the winter that just won't let go...

 April 19

Townsend's solitaire
    This bird was in the yard today--I was thinking it was the catbird that often hangs around in the Spring, but its bill was smaller.  I posted the photo to a birder's group I frequent and they identified it as a Townsend's Solitaire, a robin sized thrush.  I remember the name from years ago.  They only live in western North America.
    There was a fresh covering of snow this morning, and more predicted over the next two days.  So after glazing a couple kilnloads, I recorded a couple blues:
Wee Midnight Hour BluesSolid Gone (Cannonball Blues)


April 20

Green winged teal
    It's still a bit early for most wild flowers, so it looks to be a birdey time of year.  This is a green winged teal, first I've identified (they're common both in Europe and the US).  I saw it on a pond in the Silver Valley today where we went to church.
    Several inches of snow are predicted over the next day or so.  It was already snowing for a while this evening.  Whee.

April 21
    The storm wasn't all that bad...   It did snow a half dozen times, but would melt between times.  A walk to the lake this evening showed the lake filling rapidly, grass greening on the shores, and only plowed piles of snow remain in the open areas.  Red necked grebes are back with their loon-like laugh, and an osprey as well.   Spring beauties are blooming on the way down in a few places...  Spring is trying hard to come, and it would be thoroughly enjoyable if it were only 30 degrees warmer...
    Bim Bom (video at Youtube)   is an early MIDI music composition of mine, a canon (or round).  I just thought of converting it to guitar today, and found that mouth whistling was the best second instrument for it.  I didn't bother to make a video of the guitar work, so instead I just slowly panned the afternoon sky during a partly cloudy part of the day, and added the music as the soundtrack.  I added an extra guitar track for the third time through.   It's getting comments and views rather quickly at Youtube.

April 22
    This was our designated nice day of the week, with rain and snow scheduled through the rest of the foreseeable future.  It got to 45 (5C) which, with sunshine, didn't feel too bad...  I finished turning the soil for the small vegetable garden, and will probably plant the kind of seeds that don't mold in clammy weather soon.
    I made a lot of pots yesterday, so like a hangover after a binge, I had a lot of pots to trim today.  Hmm.  This analogy works if you assume that throwing pots is fun, and trimming them isn't.  There's some truth in that...  

April 23
    Yes it snowed all morning, but mostly melted between showers.   As evening was approaching, we took a walk to the lake and up the ridge.  It was too dark (and sprinkling) to be clear about what everything was, but we saw a muskrat, ducks, geese, and deer, as well as grass widows and buttercups.  Ice floes were floating downlake from the main lake, which is probably breaking up currently.  The lake is still about two feet below the full pool...  I read an article tonight on how the whole Western US benefited from ample snowfall this winter.  I'm hoping for a great Spring flower season to make up for the prolonged winter.  
    The gray Townsend's Solitaire bird is still hanging around our yard, silent and solitary.  Since it perches on raspberry plants, it may end up a victim of our cats...  Rufous sided towhees have returned also in the last week or two.

April 24
    The snow is mostly gone from both gardens now, and even though it was drizzling lightly, I thought I'd prune the parts of the fruit trees that were buried in snow earlier.  I got done, put away the shears and bucket, and saw all the raspberry canes that needed pruning.  I got out the bucket and shears, pruned them, and put away the bucket and shears.  Then I noticed the grape vines that needed pruning.  Got bucket, shears, pruned, put them away, and ignored anything else...  
    Later, whenever I was tempted to walk to the lake, it would rain a bit harder to discourage me.  Still, it was rain, not snow, so that's progress.

April 25
    I did get the children's librarian job, starting Monday.  I look forward to the new possibilities.
    In pottery work, the new clay finally showed its achilles heel--throwing off the hump...  I had an order for about 40 goblets, and of the first 20 to emerge, 8 had S-cracks in the middle of the bottom. These cracks are common with throwing off the hump--the center of the clay doesn't get compressed enough, and the clay gets twisted a bit in the throwing process, resulting in the S shaped cracks that appear in the bottom either in drying or firing.  I started making more, trying to remember to compress them when leather hard, but it's hard to remember to add a new process to an old technique.  I may discontinue making goblets--they're pretty clunky compared to the glass competition...
    In the afternoon I started removing nails from a rotted out porch on our cabin.  One of the tools inherited with the cabin is a nail puller.   This is not a crow bar, but a tool that digs into the wood to extract the nail.  I wouldn't have known what the tool was, except that I used one when I lived in an old granary near Dennison Minnesota.  Our landlord then (and still a close friend) showed us how to use it, and took money off our rent for time spent deconstructing buildings with it...  Anyway, I pulled most of the nails on the large deck today, and hope to have it deconstructed tomorrow or Sunday.

April 26
    I made two trips to the lake looking for beaver activity--we some some last night at dusk--but it was too dark to photograph.  I never saw them either time. But our attention was caught by a daredevil snowmobiler who cut across the water at the swimming beach with his snowmobile.  That was pretty impressive.  Then he slew around on the beach and headed out again, this time straight towards us, near the bridge.  He apparently couldn't steer very well...  He killed the engine about 15 feet short of the rock fill for the road, and by the time we looked over the embankment, his machine was sunk, and he was swimming to shore.  His girlfriend came along saying,  "What do we do now?"  We left them to ponder it...  Sometimes stupidity has its own rewards...
    It reminded me of the time I lived on Fox Lake in Minnesota when we watched a fairly new car get pulled out of the ice, where it broke through.
   
April 27
    Besides church and working on the deck, I shopped for professional clothes today.  Most of my jeans and shirts get rips and paint and stuff on them.  I don't like being a snappy dresser, but there's a dress code for librarians...  On the way in to Coeur D'Alene to shop I saw a lot for sale covered in yellow fawn lilies
  Once a lot is developed, the first thing to go forever are the wildflowers.  Fortunately there is still a lot of untouched land left in the west, but it's disappearing rapidly in our area...  (I probably harp on this regularly--consider it my Earth Day rant, a bit late).
    I removed the rest of the deck covering, exposing the joists, which will be doubled with materials from the part I took down.  Part of the problem the deck had was poor drainage caused by putting the 2 X 6's right next to each other, instead of with a half inch gap to allow water to pass freely.  The deck was under a fir tree, and the fine needles tended to clog the drainage as well.  Also the supporting boards were rough cut pine, and I think the rough texture encouraged water soaking in, creating some rot.
    We've had two nice Spring days in a row, as much as the weather will allow without a few days rain/snow for penance.  Penance scheduled to start tomorrow, as well as the library job...   Nothing like rain to make an inside job agreeable...

April 28
    The bee tree on our property that I worried about having Colony Collapse Disorder proved to be an empty worry--they're out and about with the warm weather...  I was considering blocking up the hole, if it was only going to be a bee deathtrap...
    The first day of any job is stressful.  Libraries can seem to the casual user very simple, but with all the different media now included there are a lot of systems to learn.   I learned how to check out books, check out Internet computers, order books from other libraries and fill orders, help with the preschool program (all mine starting next week),  and a sampling of a lot of other bureaucratic but essential minutiae which keep a library functioning.  I'll know better how I feel about it in a few weeks, when I'm comfortable with the systems.  The previous libraries I worked at were only at the dawn of using computers, and even though I'm comfortable using computers, every new program has a learning curve...


April 29
    red crossbill
    I was working on the deck, and noticed some red crossbills (and one pine siskin) patiently going through the fircones.  They were so diligent that I had time to bicycle 4 blocks to get my camera and return to get some good pictures.  They were so tame I could stand about 8 feet away from them, but they were so active that the photos were often blurred.  The male on the left shows the characteristic crossed bill tip, which somehow helps them get fir cone seeds.  The female has a faint yellowish color on her breast and rump, making them another unlikely bird couple.  I couldn't ask them about their relationship with the pine siskin--just friends, no doubt...
    The second day of library work was less stressful, and by the end of the day some of the backlog of work accumulated while they were short a librarian was alleviated, making for a reduction in pressure all around.  There are still a lot of systems to get used to...

April 30
    I spent part of the day practicing music for a wedding happening this weekend.  My sister in law will be playing the keyboard, and I will play guitar and pennywhistle.   The days lately are just packed.    The library excitement is starting to wear off, as it was a slow day, so I ended up doing some shelving and covering paperback books.  I'm content with these mundane tasks because they help make a library function, and I do value libraries highly.  On my breaks I mostly look at books and films in the collection, although my free time is a lot less to enjoy those things, particularly in the three middle days of the week when I work from 2 to 7 pm.
    I'm still doing pottery work in the mornings, having put on handles and trimmed hanging planters this morning, and fired a glaze this afternoon.


Books read, and films of note.

Tishomingo Blues by Elmore Leonard.  There is a blues connection in the book, a black mobster who comments on Robert Johnson and other blues illuminaries while plotting to overthrow his boss.  The story focuses on an aging high diver, used to living on the edge, getting pulled into the edgier world of the mob after witnessing a mob killing.  The author Leonard is always a fast ride.  One thing about his writing.  Tends to write short terse phrases.  Doesn't worry about complete sentences.  Very effective for him.  Lots of best sellers, movies, etc.  Get Shorty, The Big Bounce to name a couple.

A Confederacy of Dunces
by John Kennedy Toole.  This is probably the third time I've read the book, well described in Wikipedia. I only learned from the Wiki article that the book received a Pulitzer Prize (posthumously, as the author had committed suicide 11 years before publishing).  It is easy to hate the self absorbed obese lying protagonist, who jinxes every situation he is involved in -- the perfect antihero.  But by the end of the book, he earned my grudging respect--even more for the author who so cleverly manipulates our sensibilities.  On one level, the book is filled with sexual, racial, and urban stereotypes, and low humor.  But there are many more levels to the book.  The Wiki article says the outline of the book imitates a work by the oft cited philosopher Boethius, whom most of us have never heard of.  "Whoa!" as Jones says frequently in the book...

Ship of Fools by Richard Russo.  A sci fi novel of a wandering lost starship encountering a derelict alien vessel.  It focuses more on the relational aspects than a typical sf novel.  Well written, but a bit slow on the action for us popcorn chompers.

Sourcery
by Terry Pratchett   Hilarious fantasy is as rare as funny crime novels.  Only one author did it as well as Terry Pratchett (Douglas Adams--Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy), but he was far less prolific than Pratchett (who's now suffering from early onset dementia).  Although the plot of this early Discworld novel, as in many novels, involves saving the (disc) world, no other novels require a wizard with no magical powers and an orangutan librarian who only speaks the words ook and eek).

Good Behavior by Donald Westlake  Funny crime novels seem a contradiction in terms, but no one does them better than Donald Westlake.  Engaging misfit burglars, clever plots...  In this one Dortmunder and his gang are blackmailed by an order of silent nuns to free one of their order who's being held captive in a skyscraper by her wicked wealthy father, who hopes to reprogram her to a normal vocation.

The Mouse and his Child by Russell Hoban.  Probably the third time I've read this juvenile novel intended for adults.  Packed full of philosophy, laden with gratuitous violence against small rodents, often by larger rodents.  There is no book as heartwarming in the end.  Yes, it's hard to reconcile these apparent contradictions, but there is no other book quite like it...

Fletch's Moxie  
by Gregory MacDonald.  The Fletch novels, and Flynn novels, are great detective fiction with a good deal of satire imbedded.  Fletch starts out as an investigative reporter, but by this novel he's become quite wealthy.  The Flynn novels involve a Boston police inspector, with a touch of secret service built in.  A couple Fletch novels were made into fairly good movies with Chevy Chase in the 80's.  This was a reread for me--even with a bad memory I started remembering whodunnit, so I was more alert this time for the telltale clues...

Film: The Black Swan 1942Tyrone Power, Maureen Sullivan.  Every scene like an old masters pirate painting, classic swashbuckler, great sets, costumes, dialog, and action.  Who could ask for anything more?  Far superior to the Pirates of the Caribbean stuff.

Film: Bullitt 1968.  Maybe in the 60's police lieutenants ran around catching bad guys without backup or radios...  It made for a good movie whether that was true or not--nice photography, great chase sequence, not overly talky.

Film: Peeper  Michael Caine and Natalie Wood are enough to keep this detective story entertaining.  Available for free viewing (broadband, with many irritating commercial breaks) at hulu.com


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