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Brad's Blog
Since blogging is riding a crest of popularity, and I have time to waste, I'm introducing this as a new feature.  I've always viewed my whole webpage as a blog with actual content, but now will try adding comments to this page on a regular basis for the more ephemeral thoughts.  Click here to zoom down to today's entry.


July 1, 2005

    We have friends visiting, who always stop on their way to their relatives in Seattle.  We always stop at their house on our way to relatives in Minnesota, so it makes for a nice symmetry.  But guests means I'm too busy to start taking pictures (which I'd like to do) or reflect deeply for this journal.  We had the most fun playing the word game where you make up likely (or extremely bogus sounding) definitions for wildly unusual words (like "plonk" which is British slang for cheap wine).  I've also got to fit in glazing a kiln load of pots for a wholesale order, and get started making donuts.  It's good to be busy.

July 2, 2005

    I just got enough time today to visit our lake with my new camera, so here's a sample:

Because the camera can see better than me, and a lot better than I can see through the little viewfinder, it means I'm spending time taking pictures instead of just enjoying seeing this duck family.  But life is always a tradeoff.  At least now I can identify the ducks when I get home.  Except none of the identification pictures looked to me exactly like this duck.  I'd guess they were Barrow's Golden Eyes, but one nice thing about the web is you can find people willing to help you identify.  So I hope to post the species name tomorrow.

July 3 addendum: Someone else guessed a Common Goldeneye, but the web says they're more eastern birds, so I'm sticking with this for now.  P.S.  The birders are divided, but all agree they're goldeneyes.  You can see that in the picture...
 

July 3, 2005

    For good reason one doesn't hear the expression "sitting in the catbird seat," much anymore, as it evokes no useful image to most.  I seem to recall a James Thurber short story which refers to it, possibly with that name...  Here's a link explaining Thurber was the first to use it in print, based on the colorful play by play announcing of Red Barber, and saying that the origin is the catbird assuming the highest branch to sing from.
Here's a catbird image, taken with the new camera:

It's a dull gray robin sized bird with a darker bar on top of its head.  It does have a distinctive meow call, and they are known for their mimicking, but I noticed this one by listening to the lovely and varied call it makes just sitting in its catbird seat.
    By coincidence, I feel I am sitting in the catbird seat today ( the phase apparently means in a position of power or prominence)--having won the grand prize at the local fireworks stand (about $100 worth of fireworks).  Meanwhile the 4th of July weekend is always the biggest time for sales of pottery, and the weather is great this year (unless you like it hot enough for swimming).  The first strawberries and raspberries are finally ripening, and the garden is awash in spinach and greens, with the peas and greenbeans getting ready to flower.  For gardeners this is a key time, when you go from savoring the first small fruits, over to the world of "bountiful," where you look for people to give produce to.
    Winning the fireworks seems a cosmic balance to the drawing I'll have on the 4th for $25.00 worth of stuff, which I've done regularly for several years, usually with only around a dozen entrants.  I was thinking about ending the contest, but having just won something makes it seem more worthwhile to continue.  I always feel sorry for the losers, but the winner becomes a catbird for the day...

July 4, 2005

    So here I am in the moose costume,  playing Grateful Dead songs on the banjo in the 4th of July parade, leading the motorized kids division, or trailing the walking division, depending on your spin.  My son's girl friend Susa made the costume for him, and I was pleased to fit in it.  I spent about a half hour after that backing and harmonizing with The Good News Singers from our local church at the Old Fashioned 4th celebration in the Park.  Later we watched the local 15 minutes of fireworks, and returned to our house to light about a third of the fireworks I'd won last weekend (another third we'll use on Epiphany, and the last third we'll save for next year).
    I was chatting to a grocery clerk at our grocery store about winning the big packet of fireworks, and the person in line in front of me said he'd won the same deal from Rathdrum (our nearest neighboring town), and lit them all off on the third (fireworks is a multiday event here usually, but especially this year with the 4th on a Monday).
    The local fireworks display is worth commenting on.  The locals crowd in to one of the town ballparks at dusk.  Then there's a potluck of locals doing their fireworks right in the audience, versus the surrounding houses that are launching the mortar type ones, sort of goading the "professionals" to get going.  Most times there is a fireline--this time we didn't see any (it was getting dark), and ended up closest of anyone to the display.  As a result the display would often go off directly over us.  Small town displays are not, I'm sure, as impressive as the big urban ones, but the closeness of the viewing plus the ease of leaving without traffic jams makes up for a lot in the experience.
    When our kids were little, we would light off the fireworks while they watched.  Somehow the table's turned, and now we are the spectators.  A tradition has evolved with our sons, of doctoring up some of the fireworks with other materials, including gunpowder, extra small fireworks, and the like.  It adds an element of unpredictability.  The home fireworks otherwise might pall in comparison with the big show.  The excitement level also stays higher from the closeness of the spectators (10 feet or so), occasionally requiring deft movement to avoid glowing spinning things.
 

July 5, 2005

    Today I had to drive 400 miles total to deliver a load of pottery.  I always enjoy the drive across wheat fields and arid central Washington.  I kept my photographer eyes peeled for subjects for my new camera.  The wheat was looking nearly ready to harvest .  The chaparal remains wherever it's too rocky or steep to plant (and my heart lies with it--the greasewood and wild flowers).  In the area near Mansfield there are lots of 20 foot or taller glacial erratic basalt rocks, deposited as the glaciers melted a long time ago.  A number of them look like this, two stones with a gap in the middle.  From the pile of rubble it is easy to deduce that they were once one rock, just weathered into bits.  The type of basalt they are made from has lots of fissures which will harbor the all powerful water, which cracks off chunks in the freeze-thaw cycle.
    I also saw deer who were startled when I stopped half a mile away to photograph them.  Either they've learned caution from the hunters with telescopic scopes, or they're still spooked from the 4th celebration booms, which no doubt make a lot of animals edgy.

July 6, 2005

    A quiet day, so here's one of the pictures I got with the telescopic lens on my new camera (12X magnification), Panasonic Lumix FZ20PP:


I think they're young Whitetail bucks, in a field left fallow to conserve moisture.

July 7, 2005

    As a child I would help a bit in my father's garden, where sometimes tomatoes would sprout from last year's crop.  He told me they were volunteers, and would let them grow, but from their late start they seldom produced anything.  Also at our lake cabin we would spit the seeds of watermelon (now becoming an archaic idea with the prevalence of the seedless varieties) off the balcony onto the steep side hill, and volunteer watermelons would have a run at reproducing, but invariably fail.
    In order to maximize space in the garden, I sometimes interplant a late crop like corn with an early crop like spinach.  Now that I have two gardens, the space usage isn't so critical, but I still sometimes do it anyway.  Currently my earliest spinach is starting to flower.  Most gardeners pull it up at this point, as it looks irritating to the organized mind.  But I like to leave a row or so for seed.  I collect seeds from spinach, peas, and green beans (the last two of which are self pollinated, and all of which are not hybridized).
    When weeding and thinning, I have a weakness for volunteer flowers, and leave them to add to the mix of the late summer garden.  So where the greens grew, cosmos and poppies are coming along to fill the gap.  By leaving them to flower, I guarantee their continued presence as volunteers the next year.
    A side note: although my father was not an organic gardener, from my earliest memories he was a firm believer in compost, and had different systems every place he lived.  I've found, like him, that it's easier to add compost to a bin than to remove it...

July 8-10, 2005

    They say you can never go home again, and that's true, because there's usually someone else living in your old domicile.  But you can visit, which is what we've been doing, for the 100th anniversary of a church my wife Althea was the pastor of, until a couple years ago, in central Idaho.  It was also the 5th anniversary of my son Forrest's high school graduation, so we went the day before for "Prairie Days," a day of small town celebration.  We learned that only 10 year anniversaries are recognized with a class float, but he saw several from his class, as well as other friends from school.  The class of 1975 had the distinction of wettest float, as their children or grandchildren (in a long tradition) pelted them with water balloons , to which the parents responded in kind.

Aside from water balloons, candy was the main thing tossed from the floats, with it ending up littering the street, as the youngsters finally wore down from dashing out and snatching it.
    Prairie Day usually goes all day, with  music and games in the parks, barbecues, etc.  But this one got pretty well hobbled by a light rain getting serious about an hour after the parade.

Sunday's church anniversary went off very well, with only a hint of sprinkles during the outside pig roast lunch.  You can see the model of the church that went in the parade.  I had my own small part in the observance, making commemorative mugs and ornaments for the occasion.  Althea could have ridden on the float in the parade as former pastor, but deferred.
    Aside from the strong sense of community in this slowly dwindling population, the land of the Clearwater area is powerfully attractive as well, including deep canyons, and rolling farmland framed by distant mountains.  Here's some yellow canola blossoming against the backdrop of Cottonwood Butte:
The area is known as the Camas Prairie (of which there are two so designated in Idaho).  It's named for a spring bulb flower which made an ocean of blue flowers on the prairie in the spring, and produced a staple carbohydrate for the Nez Perce Indians, who subsisted largely on it and salmon from the Clearwater. Both the camas and salmon are scarcer, and the cultivated fields are a different sort of beauty.

    Both wildlife (such as deer and elk) and wildflowers survive on the fringes, such as in this spectacular canyon (off the Central Ridge Road)

Many deer live in the canyon and venture up into the farmers' fields to enjoy the grain, making them pests for the farmers, who either hunt them themselves or invite others there to help control the population.  As in many farming areas, the population is dwindling as increased mechanization replaces the need for human labor, and as many farm children grow up to  move off to less demanding careers elsewhere.

July 11, 2005
    Every gardener hates to leave home during the growing season.  When I left for the weekend, there was only a small handful of ripe raspberries.  When I picked them today, there was about 6 pints.  The first zucchini and tomato are ripe, ahead of the peas for the first time.  You should never leave a garden when the zucchini hits its stride, or you'll be plagued with giant zucchini, which seem a shame to waste, but no one really wants them (link to my zucchini poem).

July 12, 2005
    I glazed two kiln loads today, worked on a beginner's pottery video with my sons, and played music tonight at a jam in Spokane.  Besides that it was a beautiful day, but I was only out in it for about a mile walk taking photographs in downtown Spokane. When I got home I found I'd smudged the lens, so they were mostly disappointing.  I noticed I'd hit the 500 mark for photos on the new camera--probably more shots in two weeks then I took with film cameras in 5 years...

July 13, 2005
    I picked the first cucumber today, and raspberry picking has become a daily necessity.  It's too bad it all happens at once in the summer--swimming weather, garden work, and free concerts in parks.  There are a couple good free concerts in Spokane this weekend--folk music at the Fox Theater, and the Spokane Symphony in the park. But instead I'll be playing music on Saturday at a Spokane garden show (when I suppose I really should be picking raspberries and selling pots).  It's nice to have good things to choose from.

 July 15, 2005
    To illustrate the things one does to be a professional potter, today I:
Made handles for some pitchers and trimmed some French Butter Dishes, from yesterday.
Unloaded a bisque kiln, got a call that my clay order was in, and drove 70 miles round trip to get it , including hand loading the 3000 lbs onto  the van and trailer.
With help of my sons, unloaded the 3000 lbs into the pottery workshop (partially using an old red wagon to haul it 200 lbs at a time).  Some of the clay goes down into the root cellar under the workshop, as there isn't room in the shop.
Then I poured some scrap glaze into a mysterious failure batch of crystalline glaze, hoping the glop I added would make it all smooth out into something salvageable, instead of a $30 mistake.  I made one small tile of this to stick in the next kiln firing.
I then glazed enough pots for two kiln firings, while (with the help of my sons) waiting on customers.
Originally I thought I was going to drive 40 miles the other direction to take down an exhibit at the Post Falls library, but one of the pottery guild members saved me the drive by taking them home.
Speaking of the pottery guild, I volunteered to make them a webpage, which process I started yesterday.
Meanwhile, my wife took the car to be serviced (we drive a lot--it was a few thousand miles past oil change time).

Aside from pottery, there was the hour I spent picking raspberries this morning, and the overnight guests we have for tonight.
Summer is a busy time.

July 16, 2005
    The guests included a surprise young relative of theirs, who had gone to Seattle to see the Chieftains, his and my favorite Irish band.  It was clear from the start we had a lot in common. Unfortunately there was little time on the schedule to get to know each other musically, so I loaded him up with my musical CD's and some Grateful Dead concerts.
    The Musicians Anonymous had a very fine time playing music in a beautiful garden in Spokane Valley today.  In the frenetic atmosphere of a folk festival we can be overlooked, but this was a good setting for our quiet and thoughtful old-time music.  And the best thing was, the downpour didn't start till 5 minutes after we quit...
    This afternoon I spent a good deal of time picking spinach and parboiling it in preparation for freezing.  The last lump I saved out to make quiche with.  I also made some huckleberry muffins to use up some of last year's huckleberries.  Sometime in the last week I defrosted both our fridge and freezer, in anticipation of starting to fill it with garden produce.
    On another front, I began work in earnest on the website for the local clay hobby group I belong to.  It will be up soon on the web, at the address http://www.cagni.org (for Clay Arts Guild of North Idaho).

July 17, 2005

    Being so busy lately has caused me to reflect that busy people are seldom reflective.  It explains why our presidents are like they are.
I would have thought more about it but I'm too busy.   So that's it for reflection.
    My wife is organizing a block party next week, pointing out that it's good to know who your neighbors are.  Forrest responded, saying, that way you can know which neighbors you'd want to have watching your property, and which neighbors you'd want to watch when they're on your property...
     The cagni.org website is now up.

July 18, 2005
       It was swimming weather today.  I've been trying to swim  in the lake daily (it's something, like fresh cherries, you don't get to experience most of the year).  I bring along my new camera, hoping for wildlife, but it's been pretty boring.  Until today.  I finished swimming, and was about to leave when a female duck came in quick and quacking.  That's passe, but I'd never seen a group of ducklings come out of the rushes at the sound of her quack before, which they did today.  So I tried to take a picture of her and her 5 ducklings.  After that I looked up and saw an osprey circling on thermals at the end of the mill pond, and began trying to photograph it.  It plunged in the pond and caught a fish.

    Here it is lifting the fish out of the water.
    Then 3 seagulls mobbed the osprey, their typical tactic to make other birds (generally other seagulls) drop the food so they can get it.  The osprey managed to elude the seagulls, but while about 100 feet in the air, ended up dropping the fish anyway, which made a very loud plop when it hit.  The osprey continued on, apparently assuming that fish was long gone, although a later photo showed  it (and its mate) apparently holding a fish, so maybe I just missed the retrieval while photographing.  I took a lot of other pictures, but moving birds are challenging to focus on and shoot, so most were not so vivid as this one.
    It's an amazing corollary of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, that you can't both experience something and photograph it at the same time.  So you have to pick and choose as a photographer which you'd rather do.  I've seen osprey diving at fish quite a few times, so I'm happy I opted to photograph this one instead of just watching it.
    But it reminds me of when I had a summer pottery intern, whose mother was passing through and wanted to visit.  She entered with a video camera to her eye,  and kept it going while getting a tour of the house, down to our unique bathroom with handpainted tiles in the shower.  My recollection is that she was only there while videotaping, but I may have colored the experience with time...

July 19, 2005

 I set out to hunt marmot today.  My son's girlfriend is coming to visit tomorrow, and enjoys wildlife.  This spring I visited the Finch Arboretum in Spokane and found a lot of marmots running around.  Marmots are basically the same as woodchucks and groundhogs.  This particular one is a yellowbellied marmot.  Although living a block from the internet in the city of Spokane (and all along the Spokane river, including the most urban sector downtown, where I've seen them frequenting dumpsters), they are still wild, fairly shy, retaining millennia of caution.  I found a pair back in the dark rocky corner of the park, and the pictures came out a bit blurred. Then as I drove away, one went scampering by on the sidewalk at the entrance. So here's a marmot picture from today:

July 20, 2005

    I have a friend who juggles.  He started on his own, and began teaching the kids in elementary class he taught.  He taught his own kids to juggle.  He started a youth juggling group.  He took them on the road to national juggling competitions.  He started a local juggling convention.  Each step is like adding a ball when juggling--it gets harder to keep them all in the air.
    Summer is like that.  Once the raspberries start, if you go more than two days they turn dark and don't taste as good.  Today was the first day we had enough peas to shell and cook, and not just snack on in the pod.  I let the second cutting of the little broccoli florets get too old, so I had to pick them off.  The rain, which has been generous so far this year, now must be supplemented by sprinklers, which means moving them regularly.  My son's girl friend has arrived for a couple week visit.  Lots of balls in the air.
    My friend who juggles has started to cut back, from overcommitment.  He doesn't run the youth juggling group.  He thinks the upcoming juggling festival may be the last.  The good juggler knows how many balls he can sustainably juggle.  If he can fit it in, though, my friend likes to come here when the raspberries are ripe and pig out.  That's something you can only do in summer.
    Anyway, I must not have enough balls in the air yet, as I've time to philosophize.  While baking granola.
 

July 21, 2005
    Since my son's girlfriend is visiting, I thought it might be fun to take a little river canoe ride. Growing up in Iowa, it was the best chance to see the natural remnants, with the farmland mostly out of sight over the bank.  I'd heard that the Spokane River was Class I (beginner) from Corbin Park to the Washington border, but drove there in advance today to check the put ins and take outs.  The river itself is lovely, a clear deep green carving through rocks and gravel banks.  But the river is lined with houses, and the drive to the takeout point takes you through the village State Line, which is mostly a tawdry strip mall (with the emphasis on "strip").  It grew there when Idaho had a lower drinking age than Washington.  Anyway, the setting spoiled the potential experience for me.
    It also reminded me that  nature photographers get good at lying--catching the caged jaguar in the little patch of natural foliage to make it look wild, or leaving the junked auto out of the mountain meadow picture.
    Of course it's not just photographers.  I was at a pioneer crafts show once, eating fry bread at a native taco stand, that had some native drumming on a CD playing to supply a bit of atmosphere.  There was someone there with a microphone interviewing the owner about something.  Later I heard the same interview on NPR, where one would assume there was live drumming in the background.
    Both of these are sort of white lies--they don't hurt anyone...
    When I told my wife I didn't like the setting, she suggested canoeing the South Fork of the Coeur D' Alene river.  There everything appears pristine and lush. Unfortunately the whole basin is a superfund site, from years of mining waste depositing lead and other heavy metals in the sediments.  It makes a pretty picture, as you can see on my North Idaho webpage, but it hides a black lie...

July 22, 2005
    Today I glazed two kiln loads, after trimming yesterday's pots. In a good week I spend parts of three days throwing pots, about the same time assembling and trimming the pots, and two days glazing.  I can average two bisque firings per week, and about 3 glaze firings, all in my 7 foot electric kiln. One of the hard things to do is to figure out which pots to make to fill a kiln efficiently.  You have to think in terms of both height and diameter.  I had made a lot of bowls, many of which would sit inside each other for the bisque firing.  Bowls are sort of space hogs in the glaze firing--you can often get only 3 on a shelf which would hold 20 or more mugs or other more cylindrical pots.  So I made over 100 mini pots, about an inch and a half each in size, figuring they would fill the spaces for two glaze firings.  I nearly got all of the minipots in the first kiln I loaded, which means I wasted some space on the second kiln, lacking kiln fillers.  It's not a big deal, just means a slightly less efficient firing.  If you can squeeze one extra small pot in a firing, it can sometimes pay for the firing...

July 23, 2005
    This was the day of the block party.  It was the first party we've thrown in memory.  We are not big party people. Anything resembling a party was usually for some church event.  But our neighbor (who also never throws parties) suggested we have a block party at our new house, so we did.  I determined my role would be to get my Musician Anonymous buddies to come so I wouldn't have to talk to people.  So we had a nice time jamming, occasionally taking requests.  There were about 25 people total at the party, which lasted from 5 to about 8:30, which was about right, considering no alcohol was served.  At the end it seemed possible to have another block party next year. Got the party thing out of the way for a while, anyway.

Today I took this picture of a dragonfly. When they fly, they look pretty black- and- white- striped blurry.  It used to be if you wanted to identify something, you got a book on it, maybe from a library, and paged through it.  Now with the internet, I found the species name within a couple minutes, commonly known as the 12 spotted Skimmer.  Makes it easy for us dilettantes.  One cool thing about dragonflies is they've been around since the age of dinosaurs, as evidenced in fossils.  Gingko trees also date back that far, so they both remind me of the long pageant of life.
    One more observation.  Dragonflies are easy to ignore. I was happy to photograph this one as it rested, and it got me interested in it thinking it was rare.  But since then I saw the same species at the lake, and at our pottery shop.  Giving it a name (and a photo) helped to increase its visibility for me.

July 26, 2005
    The pots are flowing out much faster than they can be replenished now, so it's about the peak of summer. Seems to be coinciding with the first real heat wave...  If only I could have known what I'd be running out of now, I'd have made more in April.  (I'd hate to try to say that sentence in a foreign language)  Busy-ness (as well as business) is now the norm, so I'm lagging a bit on this journal.  The most notable event today was making it to the bank with a deposit, just before they closed at 6.  This may seem unimportant, but our nearest bank branch is 25 miles away, so every trip counts.  Both the city and rural highways are going full bore on their construction traffic delays--I guess it's paired sort of like snow and Christmas--having long delays when the temperatures are most prone to overheat your car.

July 27, 2005
I went on a Wild Google Chase today.  Although I'm so busy, I agreed to lead a small canoe trip including my son's visiting girl friend.  I decided on the Pend Oreille River, as I figured it's one river that doesn't run dry this time of year (because of a series of hydro dams). Google's new map/satellite view service led me to think it was about 10 miles from Newport, Washington, to the first bridge across the river.  It wasn't that the program told me the mileage--although it would have if I'd known the address of the bridge.  But the little scale of miles on their map misled me.  Anyway it was 16 miles to the next bridge.  Fortunately I was driving the route to check on put in and take out points, not canoeing for 16 miles.  So I crossed the river and checked for closer places to take out.  Results Saturday.  People were buying pots by the hundred dollar lots today.

July 28, 2005

This is my costume for the medieval festival at the local library today. My persona is a mad Frenchman,  a wandering minstrel of wandering mind.  The costume is part my son's go- to -church- hat, a cape from my other son, and a leftover bag from the giant inflated pot experiment with holes for arms and head cut in it. It shows off my middleaged physique to bad effect.
Since my own predilection is American folk and oldtime music, this was a bit of a stretch for me.  But I dredged up Riu Riu, a medieval Spanish song which sunk in my head when I was in high school from hearing madrigal singers.  Also the Child Ballad, "The Two Sisters," and my one Hamlet soliloquy (required in high school English, and I could only memorize it because it was also the text of a song from the musical Hair, and my mind is poor at memorization of lyrics apart from melodies  (it's the one that starts, I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth.)  All this nearly authentic blather will no doubt be lost on the 5-7 year olds who are the mainstay of the summer library program.
Post performance Reality check.  It was more 3-5 year olds.  I mostly played anything on guitar and tin whistle and watched the egg races and ring toss.  There was a nice magician with a pro-reading message who was the main entree.

July 29, 2005
    As if things weren't busy enough, the green beans are coming in.  Fortunately the raspberry season is dropping off.  I spent 3 hours today picking green beans in the 90 degree heat and parboiling them to get ready to freeze.  We always have way too many green beans, thanks to the variety, aptly named Provider. Once the freezer is full, we give them away to friends and the food bank.  So while delirious in the sun, it occurred to me to try and sell some to the pottery customers.  Actually I've tried this before with zucchini, and ended up just putting "free zucchini" on the sign.  Green beans are slightly more desirable, apparently, as I sold $1.50 worth today.
    Last summer the city of Spirit Lake began actually monitoring water use, and charging for use above a certain amount deemed necessary for personal use.  I fretted about this a lot last summer, as our new house has 3 lots, including the large garden and orchard.  Actually, reviewing the bills, we apparently never went over the base amount, but I was still in utility shock from tripling my local utility bill when we bought our new house.  So in my quest for mental and financial balance, it would be nice for the garden to pay for itself.
    Thinking that way is, unfortunately, a convoluting mess.  I don't know if a garden ever really pays for itself, if you count the work you spend on it, the manure, the seeds.  But I did put up 18 pints of organic green beans today, adding to the many pints of raspberries in the freezer.  Regardless of the economics, getting a small financial return works psychologically for me to feel better about watering the place, and not worrying about the total water usage.

July 30, 2005
    A red letter day today, for sure.  I glazed and fired a kilnload, sang and played banjo in a gospel group at the park, went canoeing for the first time on the Pend Oreille River, and saw Riders in the Sky, the fine old-time western group in a free outdoor concert in Liberty Lake.


They can do stuff like a version of Dueling banjos made by tapping on the side of the mouth, which Too Slim the bass player was getting into here.  Fine professionals, all.

July 31, 2005
    Since one must make hay when the sun shines, my wife and I ended up cleaning the hundreds of pots in our indoor and outdoor displays today, and refinishing the display shelves.  This, more than washing the car, guarantees that the 30 percent chance of rain tomorrow will be a dust storm followed by a smattering splattering of raindrops which will tar and feather the nice clean pots.  Tune in tomorrow for the results. 

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July
2007
August
2007
Sept.
2007
Oct.
2007
Nov.
2007
Dec.
2007
January 2006February 2006March 2006April 2006May 2006June 2006July 2006August 2006Sept. 2006Oct. 2006Nov. 2006Dec. 2006



April 2005May 2005 June 2005 July 2005August 2005September 2005October 2005November 2005December 2005

index